People

 

 

Staff

 

Becca Aue, Interim Executive Director

Chun Kwan, Planner/Mapping Specialist

Chai Ning, Neighborhood Walking Ambassador Coordinator

 

 

Volunteers and Interns

Naomi Botkin, Walkable Washington

Rick Browning, Policy Committee Member

Anna Chow, Walkable Washington

Tricia Christensen, Walkable Washington Case Study Library Editor

Jim Davis, Policy Committee Member

Bryan Fiedorczyk, Neighborhood Walking Ambassador

Shelly Fredericksen, Development Committee Member

Jonathan Freedman, Policy Committee Member

Carolyn Heberlein, Neighborhood Walking Ambassador

Ross Howell, Policy Committee Member

Jean Kim, Walkable Washington

Timothy Lowry, Neighborhood Walking Ambassador

Beau Morton, Policy Committee Member

John Reardon,  Neighborhood Walking Ambassador

Chas Redmond, Policy Committee Member

Christie Rodgers, Development Committee Member

Karla Sclater, Development Committee Member

Laurie Towey, Neighborhood Walking Ambassador

Carina Tran, Policy Committee Member

Sarah Tyack, Neighborhood Walking Ambassador

Katie Wendel, Development Committee Member

Board of Directors

 

Maggie Darlow, President, Policy Committee

Mike Ingram, Vice President, Development Committee

Millie Davis, Treasurer, Development Committee

Rob Fellows, Secretary, Policy Committee

Ethan Bergerson, Director, Policy Committee

Jonathan Cowin, Treasurer, Development  Committee

Dave Ramsay, Director, Development Committee Chair

Julia Reitan, Director, Policy Committee

John Stewart, Director, Policy Committee Chair

 

 

Advisory Board

 

Anne Vernez-Moudon, PhD, University of Washington

Bill Weis, PhD, Seattle University

 

Get involved with Feet First!

 

Staff

 

Lisa Quinn, Executive Director
What if…

…my grandparents were not inside their home, afraid to cross the street?

…every body walks because they can rather than feeling like walking is doing without?

…you found connecting with your place was worth the time?

Why walkability matters to me:

I am passionate about increasing the number of people becoming active, while taking care of our planet. I believe for our communities to thrive and be resilient everyone no matter their ability, age or where they live should have the basic right to walk to the store, school, library, to a friend’s home and to their local farmers’ market.  Walking in lots of ways is the cornerstone for public health, social equity, climate change, community engagement, safety, and transportation. While walking is a biological construct, our built environment has caused a division of our social construct. When we invite cars to our communities, with free parking, large streets and highways, we decrease the opportunities for people to walk. Promoting walkable communities, for me, is a simple and eloquent way to engage in our space and the place where we live.

 

My experience:

Since 1993, I have been involved in the sustainable transportation starting my career at a Transportation Management Association in Santa Clara, California and a consulting firm in Palo Alto, California. I traveled to the Pacific Northwest and worked for the City of Tacoma, the University of Washington, and then to the San Luis Obispo Council of Governments on the Central Coast of California. I have worked at numerous non-profits, including  BEST (Better Environmentally Sound Transportation) in Vancouver, Canada. I have developed award winning social marketing campaigns, facilitated and trained employees, received over $500,000 in grants, and designed programs in which every $1 spent generated $5 in volunteer and business contributions.

 

I graduated from San Jose State University with a B.S. in Advertising (Do you find humor in this? You, should!) and an emphasis on sociology and environmental studies. I walk my talk–I have been car-free most of my adult life and select to go by foot, bike, bus, and light rail. I am grateful to have been rewarded with work that aligns with my values.

 

Volunteers and Interns

 

 

Naomi Botkin, Walkable Washington

Naomi Botkin grew up in Kitsap County. She earned a BA in Drama with a minor in French from the Colorado College and, in fall of 2012, completed a Masters of Public Administration from the University of Washington. Naomi loves to cook, snowboard, and travel, and she sings in a local band called Tigers in the Tank. She aspires in both her personal and professional life to share her passion for sustainability across her community in Seattle.

Anna Chow, Walkable Washington

What if..
…you’re able to slow down to experience an active street life of people, animals, and places…and enjoy the spontaneity of new discoveries just by walking by.

…there are structures in the street that you can climb on or swing from?

Why walkability matters to me:

People are made to move, and walking is one of the most natural and convenient activities, and can be done even into old age. It provides one with the pace to experience things along the streetscape.

My experience:

I grew up in Vancouver, B.C., and as a school kid, walked and took transit everywhere. As an adult, I lived in Los Angeles for many years, and experienced the frustration of traffic congestion, but also saw the development of the downtown core and improved public transit over time. Living near a beach path also allowed a lot of movement on feet or on human-powered wheels. Now as a student again, in a suburban/rural area in Ontario, Canada, though the pocket where I live isn’t bad, driving is needed on the outskirts of town.  I have worked in public health, and now am studying landscape architecture, with an interest in planning related to vibrant streets.

 

Tricia Christensen, Walkable Washington Case Study Library Editor
What if…

…the average person could walk the recommended 10,000 steps in an average day just throughout his/her daily routine?

Why walkability matters to me…

Walking is a fantastic way to increase exercise and decrease many health and environmental concerns.  Safety and accessibility to walking is essential to encourage this lifelong healthy behavior.

My experience:

As a Peace Corps volunteer and rural health educator in Morocco I encouraged healthy behaviors every day, and walkability was a given in a village with very few automobiles. Upon my return to the states I vowed to keep up my walking habits and I am excited to be working with Feet First to promote walking well-being for everyone.

My day job:

Lifestyle Management Health Coach with Healthways, a company promoting health and wellness improvement.

Jim Davis, Policy Committee
What if…

…every road in the greater Seattle area had a safe place to walk?

Why walkability matters to me:

Global warming is one of the great challenges of our time. Walking has the lowest environmental impact of all ways of getting around, and we should do everything we can to support it. Feet First is making a difference towards that end at the local level.

My experience:

For nine years I was a pedestrian planner with the King County Department of Transportation. Much of my work involved planning for sidewalks and other pedestrian facilities in unincorporated King County. My work with Feet First gives me the chance to continue work on a cause that I’d developed a true passion for in my prior role.

My day job:

Independent Researcher/Writer/Editor

 

Bryan Fiedorczyk, Neighborhood Walking Ambassador

Bryan Fiedorczyk (fa-door-check) currently works as an Environmental Protection Specialist in a water infrastructure grant program for the federal government and has a background in community and environmental planning.  Bryan resides with his wife and little girl in West Seattle and enjoys walking, jogging, and cycling throughout the local neighborhoods and as his commute to work downtown.  He currently volunteers for Sustainable West Seattle with a committee that has developed and implemented a public outreach campaign promoting stormwater pollution prevention practices to local residents and community groups and also helped install two local rain gardens.  In addition to being a Feet First Watershed Walking Ambassador, he also served on the steering committee for the North East Seattle Trails project to develop the Neighborhoods on Foot community walking map.

 

Carolyn Heberlein, Neighborhood Walking Ambassador
What if…

… people used local businesses within walking distance of home and work
… people were able to walk safely on city streets without fear of automobiles, bicycles, and vegetation.
… people had walking paths to get from mass transit to their homes and places of work.

Why walkability matters to me:

Walking is my preferred exercise. I try to walk 10,000 steps every day. I meet my neighbors while gardening in my front yard, at neighborhood get togethers, at bus stops, on Feet First walks. I believe that automobiles, bicycles, and walkers/runners need their own paths for safety. Vegetation encroaches on sidewalks used by walkers. Other times, there are no sidewalks. Also paths that are combination wheels/walkers have become bicycle freeways.

My experience:

Born and raised in Seattle. I am a graduate of Chief Sealth High School and the University of Washington. I have a Bachelor of Arts in History. Now as a senior, I continue to take classes at the U of W through the Access Program.

I was a computer programmer for 42 years. I retired from full time work in August 2012. I still have a part-time position at a Fremont software company as a technical support specialist. I have lived in Fremont with my husband for 44 years where we own a home and raised 2 sons. I have been active with Feet First since January 2012. Current volunteer work includes City of Seattle Adopt-A-Street Program and Washington Butterfly Association.

 

Jean Kim, Walkable Washington

What if…

…walking is the safest mode of transportation?

…pedestrians used the center of the roads (and we call them not sidewalks, but center-walks!)? 
Why walkability matters to me:

I LOVE walking. Without walking, I was not able to enjoy the sun with my sister, go hiking with my dad, go markets with my mom, discover historic alleys with my friends, and explore cities with my husband.

My experience:

I’ve been an active urban thinker for more than ten years. My walking experience in Seoul, Singapore, Sichuan, Tokyo, Chicago, New York, and Seattle have built a unique perspective in reading city streets. I majored architecture design in Korea and currently graduated from University of Washington with a Master degree in urban planning and a global injury and violence prevention certificate from global health department. I am interested in walkable communities and safe street design.

 

Timothy Lowry, Neighborhood Walking Ambassador

Timothy (PE, MBA, LEED™ AP) is a Neighborhood Walking Ambassador because moving around self-powered is key to sustainable communities and healthy living. Leading Stairway Walks is very empowering because neighbors experience access unavailable to cars. Access that is often more direct and usually quite whimsical and uplifting.

 

Timothy is a sustainability expert, Professional Civil Engineer, and urban planner focusing on strategic sustainable development including transportation planning and watersheds planning.  Additional experience includes green building, solid waste management, flood plain management, rainwater harvesting, permeable pavement, and community engagement. He was also the Low Impact Development LID Coordinator for Pierce County, WA, fostering rural and suburban sustainable site design.

 

Timothy enjoys rollerblading and biking in West Seattle with his wife and two very energetic boys. He also run-commutes to downtown and leads West Seattle Ultimate Family Frisbee.

 

Laurie Towey, Neighborhood Walking Ambassador
What if…
…You could go online and partner up to walk one-on-one with someone any day of the week, in any neighborhood?
…If more people would make eye contact, smile, nod or say hello to someone when walking past them.
Why walkability matters to me:
It connects people and neighborhoods. It keeps people healthy. It’s free and fun!
My experience:
I have a degree in Sociology from the University of Washington, and have a keen interest in people, especially seniors.  I volunteered with seniors for 7 years before becoming a caregiver and recruiter for With A Little Help, Inc. in 2012.

 

Sarah Tyack, Neighborhood Walking Ambassador
What if…
…Groups of people took the time to take in the sights, smells, and sounds of nature, whether it’s in a neighborhood or by a lake. Would that make us more connected to each other and be better able to see the value of caring for each other, our community, our mother earth, and ourselves?
Why walkability matters to me:
I love walking. I find it to be a good way to exercise outside. I also like to explore when I get lost, which happens a lot. It just makes the adventure more fun!
My experience:
I was a long distance runner for many years and then I had a bad injury…or two 🙁 I’ve discovered walking and love it! I walk for exercise and for exploration. I also find that good conversation can happen when walking with others. I’m a registered nurse and board certified lactation consultant in private practice. I work with new families and babies and see them in their homes. I drive a lot for work and I relish the time I get to have outside.

 

Board of Directors

 

Feet First is supported by a dedicated Board of Directors. These knowledgeable and passionate individuals help to accomplish Feet First’s mission through a set of shared values that underline our programs, policies, advocacy, and projects, which include: accessibility, diversity, grassroots activism, healthy active lifestyle, healthy natural environment, supporting local businesses, mobility, partnerships, playfulness, social justice, sustainability, and vibrant neighborhoods.

 

Our Board of Directors play a vital role in ensuring Feet First has the strategic direction and necessary resources to create walkable communities. In addition to their role as board member, each person serves on either the Policy or Communications Committee. We are grateful for their expertise and focus ranging from board governance, policy, marketing, management, transportation planning, and community engagement to ensure financial stability of the organization.

 

 

Ethan Bergerson, Policy Committee
What if…

There were slides, ziplines, and trampolines built around Seattle’s hills?

Why walkability matters to me:

Beyond the health and environmental benefits, I simply find walking to be the most pleasurable way to get to where I need to go (besides ziplines and slides, of course). I especially love my morning walk to preschool with my three year old son Pascal; it’s a chance to wake up both of our bodies and minds as we walk, run, skip, and piggyback our way to school. Our bodies evolved to walk, but too often we are forced to strap ourselves down, sit in traffic, and hunt for parking because safety hazards, dead-ends, and other needless roadblocks which are especially hard for kids to get around. I volunteer for Feet First because I believe that everyone should always have the freedom to choose how to get to where they need to go and the option to get around safely and conveniently on foot.

My experience:

I have been working and volunteering with nonprofits since 2003 with experience in communications, grassroots organizing, volunteer management, fundraising, and advocacy. In 2004, I directed an office for Environment California which was responsible for gathering 35,000 letters to the governor in just 6 weeks asking to limit greenhouse gas pollution from cars and trucks. In 2007, I participated in a program at the Leon Panetta Institute of Public Policy in which I received training directly from the future Secretary of Defense and also interned in the office of U.S. Congressman Adam Schiff. From 2008-2011, I worked at the Sierra Club to pass the TransAlta Energy Transition Bill, which will prevent over 10 million tons of greenhouse gas pollution a year by phasing down Washington’s only coal-fired power plant and creating a $55 million fund for clean energy development and job creation. I have a Master in Public Administration with a specialization in nonprofit management from the University of Washington Daniel J. Evans School.

My day job:

I work at Washington State Department of Transportation.

Dave Ramsay, Director, Development Committee
What if…

…half the people walked on 80 percent of their trips of one mile or less?

Why walkability matters to me:

I think that being a walkable city is fundamental to being a good city. Going for a walk is fun; but it goes way beyond that. Walking is the “silver bullet” of public policy. Better health, improved environment, reduced car traffic, connected communities, safer streets and healthy business districts all happen when people walk. What other strategy can accomplish all that? I want to help make a difference by getting more people walking more often; for business and pleasure.

My experience:

Working for cities for over 36 years; I have been involved a good deal of public policy making and its implementation. I’m also an avid walker.

My day job:

Former City Manager for the City of Kirkland (retired in March 2010).

John Stewart, Director, Policy Committee
What if…

…businesses respected their pedestrian customers, and worked with Feet First to make it easy for their customers who arrive on foot?

Why walkability matters to me:

I’ve been a pedestrian for years – not that we all aren’t in one way or another, but I started walking a mile to the bus my freshman year in high school, and realized I really liked to walk. I didn’t own a car until I got married at 30, so I spent a lot of time on my feet. I grew frustrated with the inequity of the power relationship between pedestrians and automobiles, and the sense that our streets were designed to disadvantage pedestrians. So I heard about Feet First in a little note in the (then print edition) PI and went to a meeting (in the food court at Westlake Center no less!) with four or five people…this was in 2000. I’ve been on the Board since since 2003.

My experience:

I’ve been involved with pedestrian issues with Feet First for nearly 15 years now, so I have historical perspective on what’s been done, and what’s worked, as well as relationships with a number of people around the region who are working on pedestrian issues. I’m technologically adept, a good listener, and a strong proponent for neighborhood action and activism. I’m also a good writer and editor.

My day job:

System & Network Analyst at Cerner

 

Working Committees

 

Feet First has two committees to support Feet First’s mission of ensuring that all communities in Washington are walkable. These diverse and engaged representatives provide their insight and experience in the areas of Policy and Development. The committees meet monthly and consist of board and non-board members. Committee membership is approved by the Board of Directors.

 

Policy Committee

The Policy Committee is responsible for supporting the legislative agenda of Feet First. By way of a strategic work plan, the engaged group writes policy papers, participates in transportation advocacy day, advocates for better design and funding by writing letters and meeting legislators and supports legislation across the state that creates walkable communities. The committee meets the first Wednesday of the month from 6:30 PM to 8:30 PM.

 

Development Committee

The Development Committee is a talented group responsible for supporting the development, marketing, fundraising and event management activities for the organization. The Development Committee assists Feet First with the implementation of the Annual Appeal, Give Big, Walktober, the Walkable Washington Symposium and other signature events. This committee has three task forces to support its efforts: Events, Grants, and Fundraising. The Development Committee meets the first Monday of the month from 6:30 PM to 8:30 PM. We are currently recruiting volunteers for this committee. To learn more, email info@feetfirst.org.

 

Advisory Board

 

The Feet First Advisory Board members are experts in the areas of urban design, architects, leadership, community development, pedestrian safety, and economic development. These selected leaders support Feet First by sharing their expertise, offering advice on difficult decisions, becoming a financial supporter and attending Feet First events. The Advisory Board responds to questions from staff members or the Board of Directors on an ad hoc basis.

 

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